Hingis taking care of business Down Under

Updated: January 27, 2006, 10:27 AM ET
By Brad Gilbert | Special to ESPN.com

MELBOURNE, Australia -- At the start of the tournament I was hoping Martina Hingis was going to play well.

Now I'm sitting here thinking she has got it going on. …I'm starting to think she can get to the final.

Hingis has great creativity in her game. She sneaks in sometimes and constantly is changing the ball pattern, not always hitting the ball inside out. She'll hit it down the line then go cross court. She's constantly moving the ball around. That's what I really like. She's constantly doing things differently.

What Hingis lacks in size and strength she makes up for in vision and anticipation. She has great eyes and sees the play earlier than her opponent and reads where the ball is going to go.

In the fourth round, she's probably going to play Australian Samantha Stosur. Hingis is in a good part of the draw, but a couple of days ago it looked like she'd be playing Mary Pierce.

All you can do is play the person in front of you. Hingis had, potentially, a reasonably tough draw in the first round against 30th seed Vera Zvonareva and she made her look pedestrian.

Hingis has said she didn't come back to be playing out on court 17, she came back to be playing in the Big House (Rod Laver Arena). Also, she's said that she's defending her final appearance from 2002 (when she lost to Jennifer Capriati). That's her mind-set; she's defending her final even though it's been four years.

Hingis is just taking care of business and I'm on board. I like what I'm seeing.

Brad Gilbert, former top-5 player and former coach of Andre Agassi, is providing ESPN.com with analysis throughout the Australian Open. For more, log onto bradgilberttennis.com

Former player-turned coach and author Brad Gilbert is an analyst on ESPN's extensive schedule of tennis programming, including, since 2009, all four majors  the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon and US Open. He joined ESPN in 2004 and serves as a studio analyst, match analyst and sideline reporter. After leaving to return to coaching rising star Andy Murray of Scotland in 2006, he came back to ESPN in 2008.