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What's Lance Armstrong's legacy, now that he has given up his fight against the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on allegations he used performance-enhancing drugs? Some say his decision to end the battle amounts to an admission of guilt. Others blame USADA for pursuing Armstrong and ruling against him despite his having passed hundreds of doping tests. Many others say his fight against cancer is more important than whether or not he used PEDs. What's your take on Lance Armstrong now?

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On Tuesday, "First Take" debated who would be the best choice as the next coach of the U.S. national men's basketball team. Mike Krzyzewski says he's done, with a successful run that ended with a gold medal after a close match against Spain. Skip Bayless thinks Doc Rivers would be the best coach, but there's a sense that Doug Collins might be a good choice as well. What's your take?

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Usain Bolt fired back at Carl Lewis after Lewis criticized the doping testing standards in Bolt's native Jamaica. Did Lewis have a point, or was he out of line?

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Boxing used to be one of the major sports in America, but it's suffered significantly as players turned to sports like football and basketball. You can see at least one symptom of this in the Olympics, where USA men's boxing failed to medal for the first time ever. Michael Wilbon, as a self-professed fan of the sport, isn't shocked by the shutout, but it's a definite disappointment in a sport that America used to dominate.


Were you shocked?

Fans in America tend to expect a lot out of our teams, but Wilbon says a dysfunctional system ensured that USA men's boxing failed to meet those expectations.

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How upset are you that USA men's boxing failed to medal in the Olympics?

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    43%
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    26%
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    31%

Discuss (Total votes: 2,862)

 

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On Tuesday, "First Take" debated ESPN.com's list of greatest male Olympic athletes. We had Michael Phelps in the top spot, followed by Jesse Owens, Carl Lewis, Mark Spitz and Michael Johnson. Skip Bayless has to know what the debate is -- if it's just about individual dominance in a sport, it'd be Phelps, but if it were all-around, Jesse Owens would get his vote. Rob Parker agrees, and Christian Fauria has Owens as No. 1 regardless of criteria. What's your take?

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