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Kyle Terada/USA TODAY Sports

Has the Pro Bowl run its course?

The Pro Bowl is the black sheep of major American All-Star games, but the NFL is trying a number of ways to make the game more relevant. Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders are part of the latest effort, as they're divvying up rosters playground-style as opposed to the traditional AFC vs. NFC matchup. Rice and Sanders made their initial selections on Tuesday, with Rice picking Drew Brees and Robert Quinn to anchor his team. We'll know soon enough if this ends up being a template for future Pro Bowls or a simple one-year gimmick.

  • What do you make of the Pro Bowl allowing former players to pick Pro Bowl rosters?

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      71%
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      29%

    Discuss (Total votes: 39,484)

  • Which twosome would you rather have to start a team?

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      56%
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      44%

    Discuss (Total votes: 65,203)

  • Will you watch the Pro Bowl on Sunday?

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      37%
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      63%

    Discuss (Total votes: 81,413)

  • Should the NFL eliminate the Pro Bowl?

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      55%
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      45%

    Discuss (Total votes: 15,166)

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Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

Deion Sanders in the Pro Bowl?

Deion Sanders was an athletic marvel, the kind of player who shut down passing games for years at a time in the NFL while simultaneously becoming a respectable baseball player. He hasn't played since 2005, but if he has his way, there will be some Prime Time at the Pro Bowl. Sanders and Jerry Rice are both taking part in a draft that will divvy up the Pro Bowl players into two rosters, and Sanders tweeted Monday that he plans on suiting up at the event. Sanders disguised himself as ''Leon Sandcastle'' and was picked first overall in a fictional NFL draft in a commercial for last year's Super Bowl, but one would think that real life wouldn't be quite so forgiving.

  • What do you make of Deion Sanders saying that he'll suit up for the Pro Bowl?

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      62%
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      38%

    Discuss (Total votes: 44,059)

  • Would you want to see Deion Sanders play in the Pro Bowl?

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      76%
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      24%

    Discuss (Total votes: 19,809)

  • Who would put on a better performance if both were to play in the Pro Bowl this year?

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      51%
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      49%

    Discuss (Total votes: 18,751)

  • Are you planning on watching the Pro Bowl?

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      46%
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      54%

    Discuss (Total votes: 18,887)

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Randy Moss is no stranger to grandiose statements about his own greatness, so it's not much of a surprise that he considers himself the "greatest receiver to ever play this game". Jerry Rice's response? "Put my numbers up against his numbers." Fortunately, we can do just that. Considering their respective stats (and those of these eight other top receivers), who do you think is the greatest receiver of all time?

Greatest wide receivers

Tim Brown

Tim Brown

1988-2004
9 Pro Bowls
1,094 receptions
14,934 yards, 100 TD

Isaac Bruce

Isaac Bruce

1994-2009
4 Pro Bowls
1,024 receptions
15,208 yards, 91 TD

Cris Carter

Cris Carter

1987-2002
8 Pro Bowls
2-time All-Pro
1,101 receptions
13,899 yards, 130 TD

Marvin Harrison

Marvin Harrison

1996-2008
8 Pro Bowls
3-time All-Pro
1,102 receptions
14,580 yards, 128 TD

Don Hutson

Don Hutson

1935-45
8-time All-Pro
488 receptions
7,991 yards, 99 TD

Michael Irvin

Michael Irvin

1988-99
5 Pro Bowls
1-time All-Pro
750 receptions
11,904 yards, 65 TD

Steve Largent

Steve Largent

1976-89
7 Pro Bowls
1-time All-Pro
819 receptions
13,089 yards, 100 TD

Randy Moss

Randy Moss

1998-present
6 Pro Bowls
4-time All-Pro
982 receptions
15,292 yards, 156 TD

Terrell Owens

Terrell Owens

1996-2010
6 Pro Bowls
5-time All-Pro
1,078 receptions
15,934 yards, 153 TD

Jerry Rice

Jerry Rice

1985-2004
13 Pro Bowls
10-time All-Pro
1,549 receptions
22,895 yards, 197 TD

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Maybe Tim Brown is just a big Beastie Boys fan. Or maybe he's still stinging from the Raiders' loss to the Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. Either way, he's saying that game wasn't just a bad day for Oakland, it was "sabotage." Brown said Tuesday that then-Raiders coach Bill Callahan sabotaged the team by changing the game plan as a way to get back at the Raiders and help Jon Gruden. ESPN analyst Jerry Rice, who was also on that Raiders team, backed Brown up. So what do you think? Did Callahan intentionally blow the game plan, or was he just outcoached?

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