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Complaining about money is generally a way for a famous athlete to bring down the ire of the internet on his or her head, but Lolo Jones' recent money complaint might mask a legitimate, larger point. Jones tweeted out a Vine video of a $741.84 paycheck she received for training for the U.S. bobsled team. That's not bad for a week's pay, but the check was for seven months, a fact that Jones mocked in her video. Some fellow bobsledders were not amused, calling the video insulting. Jones said her point was to make people appreciate how hard Olympic athletes work, but her delivery might have muddled her message.

What do you think? Leave your comments below.

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Usain Bolt is the fastest man in the world, but now he wants a tryout for one of the best soccer teams in the world. We're not sure Bolt could crack Manchester United's starting lineup, but could he make it in professional soccer?

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Oscar Pistorius didn't make it to the men's 400-meter final, but his performance at the Olympics was a win in and of itself. Is Pistorius' performance just the beginning for athletes with artificial limbs?

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Are you the rubber-band archery champion at your office? Maybe you're celebrating the Olympics by throwing a party with fish and chips. How are you, SportsNation, getting into the Olympic spirit? Are you holding your own form of the Games at work? Are you testing yourself in the pool or during your run? Maybe you're just watching your favorite athletes and events on TV or on the Internet. Tell us how you're enjoying the London Games in the comment section below!

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Would a U.S. sprinter really give up her spot on the Olympic team instead of accepting a winner-take-all runoff against the runner she just tied? Jeneba Tarmoh did just that on Monday, giving her place on the women's 100-meter squad to Allyson Felix after Tarmoh's apparent place on the team was erased. But is that any stranger than the Royals-Yankees "pine tar incident" game being reversed on protest and completed almost a month later? Or Roberto Duran, one of the most feared fighters of his day, quitting in the midst of an epic welterweight title fight against Sugar Ray Leonard? Which of these is the strangest ending to a sporting event?

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