Greatest father-son combos

Vote for the greatest father-son combination of all time.

Updated: August 29, 2003, 12:08 PM ET
SportsNation

With Barry Bonds climbing up the pantheon of greatest players ever, we forget how terrific his father was -- terrific enough that they rank as SportsNation's greatest father-son combo in sports history. Check out our top 10 and then vote for your No. 1:

1. Bobby and Barry Bonds
Barry continues to onslaught the record book like no player since Babe Ruth. At age 39, he's hitting .339 with 39 home runs and a beer-league softball-like .755 slugging percentage. Combined home-run total: 984 and counting (652 for Barry, 332 for Bobby). Barry has five 30-30 seasons and Bobby had four -- no player outside the family has more than three.

2. Bobby and Brett Hull
Bobby is in the Hockey Hall of Fame and Brett will undoubtedly follow when he retires -- which would make them the first father-son Hall of Fame player combo in the four major pro sports. They are already the only father-son MVP winners: Bobby won in 1965 and '66 with the Blackhawks and Brett won in 1991 with the Blues. Brett ranks fifth all-time goals and Bobby ranks 11th.

3. Lee and Richard Petty
Lee was a three-time NASCAR season points champion and The King won the title seven times. Both won the Daytona 500. Lee had 54 career wins and Richard 200.

4. Man o' War and War Admiral
Man o' War is considered by some experts as the greatest horse ever, losing only once in his career (to a horse named Upset). He didn't win the Triple Crown in 1920 only because he was held out of the Kentucky Derby -- but his son, War Admiral, achieved horse racing's greatest feat in 1937, when he had a remarkable 8-for-8 year. War Admiral won 21 of 26 career races.

5. Ken Griffey Sr. and Jr.
Ignore Junior's latest injury problems: he's still on a Hall of Fame path as he closes in on 500 career home runs. Among his other accomplishments: 10 Gold Gloves and the 1997 AL MVP Award. Dad could play a little, too, with a .296 career average, over 2,000 hits and three All-Star appearances.

6. Archie and Peyton Manning
Both were great college quarterbacks -- Archie finished third in the Heisman voting as a senior at Mississippi and Peyton finished second -- and successful pros. Archie was a two-time Pro Bowler with the hapless Saints of the '70s, and in five years with the Colts, Peyton has been a three-time Pro Bowler and topped 4,000 yards passing four times.

7. Calvin and Grant Hill
The only members of our list who excelled in different sports, Calvin was a four-time Pro Bowler with the Cowboys who twice topped 1,000 yards and finished with over 6,000 in his career. Grant played on two NCAA championship teams at Duke and has a career NBA scoring average of 21 points per game with five All-Star appearances.

8. Rick and Brent Barry
Named one of the NBA's 50 greatest players in 1996, Rick scored 23.2 points in his NBA career and 30.5 in his four years in the ABA. He led both leagues in scoring, was a five-time first-team All-NBA selection and was Finals MVP in 1975 when he led the Warriors to the title. Remarkably, three of his sons have played in the NBA (Brent, Jon and Drew). Brent (career average of 10.7 points) is the best.

9. Felipe and Moises Alou
Felipe was a three-time All-Star with 2,100 career hits, 206 home runs and a .286 average (and a nice post-playing managerial career). Moises has over 1,500 hits with 236 home runs and a .302 lifetime average.

10. Jimmy Walker and Jalen Rose
Jimmy was the first overall pick in the 1967 NBA Draft and had a fine nine-year career with Detroit, Houston and Kansas City, averaging 16.7 points. Jalen is coming off a career-best 22.1 average for the Bulls and has scored 14.8 per game in his career.

Others receiving votes: Bob and Bret/Aaron Boone, Al Unser Sr. and Jr., Dale Earnhardt Sr. and Jr., Dolph and Danny Schayes, Kyle Rote Sr. and Jr.

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